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Home / Seminar & Event /Past Seminars / (270)Transparent organic photovoltaic cells and related devices
(270)Transparent organic photovoltaic cells and related devices
Seminar: (270)Transparent organic photovoltaic cells and related devices
Speaker: Professor Frank A. Nüesch
Time: 2016-09-23 14:00 to 2016-09-23 15:30
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Abstract

Cyanine  dyes were developed with a view to create extremely strong light-absorbers with  narrow absorption spectra at specific wavelengths. They proved particularly  successful as sensitizers in silver halide photography but also find  applications in recordable optical discs, bio-labels and all optical devices.  Only little work has been dedicated to the use of these materials as  semiconductors, which however significantly widens the span of applications.  Using choromophores with a high number of vinylene units allows producing thin  near-infrared active films with extremely high optical transmission in the  visible region. In this presentation, solar cell and photodide fabrication based  on cyanine semiconductors will be highlighted and an outlook on future  applications will be given.

 

Short  biography – Prof. Dr. F. Nüesch

After  his graduation in physics at the ETHZ in 1989, Prof. F. Nüesch became interested  in the field of experimental physical chemistry. Attracted by the groundbreaking  discoveries in artificial photosynthesis at the laboratory of Prof. Michael  Grätzel, he decided to work on a PhD thesis in the field of photoinduced  electron transfer processes involving dyes and dye aggregates. After earning his  PhD in 1995 he focused his research on heterogeneous organic-inorganic  interfaces with a view to applications in organic optoelectronic devices. As an  invited scientist at the University of Rochester (NY), he demonstrated and  explained the gigantic effect thin adsorbed layers of acids or bases can have on  the electrical properties of oxide surfaces. When he was appointed head of the  Functional Polymers laboratory at Empa in 2004, Prof. F. Nüesch continued to  pursue research and development on organic thin film devices. Today, emphasis is  given to organic solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes and  electromechanical elastomer actuators. His fields of interest encompass  aggregation phenomena in thin organic films of cyanine dyes, ion effects in  organic photovoltaic devices, modification of the dielectric constant of thin  films by insertion of metallic nanoparticles and dipolar molecules. Other topics  such as coating of organic semiconductors on flexible substrates based on  oxide-free conducting layers are investigated within EU-FP7 project TREASORES,  which is coordinated by Prof. F. Nüesch. He is also is coordinating the Swiss  photovoltaic research platform within the Competence Centre for Energy and  Mobility of the ETH domain. Prof. Frank Nüesch is adjunct professor at EPFL  teaching organic semiconductors and modern photovoltaics. He has authored and  co-authored more than 150 publications and several  patents.


(270)Transparent organic photovoltaic cells and related devices
Seminar: (270)Transparent organic photovoltaic cells and related devices
Speaker: Professor Frank A. Nüesch
Time: 2016-09-23 14:00 to 2016-09-23 15:30
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Abstract

Cyanine  dyes were developed with a view to create extremely strong light-absorbers with  narrow absorption spectra at specific wavelengths. They proved particularly  successful as sensitizers in silver halide photography but also find  applications in recordable optical discs, bio-labels and all optical devices.  Only little work has been dedicated to the use of these materials as  semiconductors, which however significantly widens the span of applications.  Using choromophores with a high number of vinylene units allows producing thin  near-infrared active films with extremely high optical transmission in the  visible region. In this presentation, solar cell and photodide fabrication based  on cyanine semiconductors will be highlighted and an outlook on future  applications will be given.

 

Short  biography – Prof. Dr. F. Nüesch

After  his graduation in physics at the ETHZ in 1989, Prof. F. Nüesch became interested  in the field of experimental physical chemistry. Attracted by the groundbreaking  discoveries in artificial photosynthesis at the laboratory of Prof. Michael  Grätzel, he decided to work on a PhD thesis in the field of photoinduced  electron transfer processes involving dyes and dye aggregates. After earning his  PhD in 1995 he focused his research on heterogeneous organic-inorganic  interfaces with a view to applications in organic optoelectronic devices. As an  invited scientist at the University of Rochester (NY), he demonstrated and  explained the gigantic effect thin adsorbed layers of acids or bases can have on  the electrical properties of oxide surfaces. When he was appointed head of the  Functional Polymers laboratory at Empa in 2004, Prof. F. Nüesch continued to  pursue research and development on organic thin film devices. Today, emphasis is  given to organic solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes and  electromechanical elastomer actuators. His fields of interest encompass  aggregation phenomena in thin organic films of cyanine dyes, ion effects in  organic photovoltaic devices, modification of the dielectric constant of thin  films by insertion of metallic nanoparticles and dipolar molecules. Other topics  such as coating of organic semiconductors on flexible substrates based on  oxide-free conducting layers are investigated within EU-FP7 project TREASORES,  which is coordinated by Prof. F. Nüesch. He is also is coordinating the Swiss  photovoltaic research platform within the Competence Centre for Energy and  Mobility of the ETH domain. Prof. Frank Nüesch is adjunct professor at EPFL  teaching organic semiconductors and modern photovoltaics. He has authored and  co-authored more than 150 publications and several  patents.