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(321) Radicals: your life is in their hands
Seminar: (321) Radicals: your life is in their hands
Speaker: Dr. JoAnne Stubbe, Novartis Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States
Time: 2018-09-24 10:30 to 2018-09-24 12:00
Venue:
Organizer:

Health Science Platform


JoAnne Stubbe is an American chemist best known for her work on ribonucleotide reductases, for which she was awarded the National Medal of Science in 2009. She currently is the Novartis Professor of Chemistry& Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. JoAnne has published many scientific papers and has been frequently recognized for her research achievements. Before JoAnne Stubbe’s work, there were no chemical mechanisms that could be written for certain enzymes. She revolutionized the biochemistry field with her first two scientific papers on enzymes enolase and pyruvate kinase. She has been active on several committees, including review boards for the NIH grants committee and the editorial boards for various scientific journals.


Venue: Meeting Room No. 8, Conference Building

(321) Radicals: your life is in their hands
Seminar: (321) Radicals: your life is in their hands
Speaker: Dr. JoAnne Stubbe, Novartis Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), United States
Time: 2018-09-24 10:30 to 2018-09-24 12:00
Venue:
Organizer:

Health Science Platform


JoAnne Stubbe is an American chemist best known for her work on ribonucleotide reductases, for which she was awarded the National Medal of Science in 2009. She currently is the Novartis Professor of Chemistry& Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. JoAnne has published many scientific papers and has been frequently recognized for her research achievements. Before JoAnne Stubbe’s work, there were no chemical mechanisms that could be written for certain enzymes. She revolutionized the biochemistry field with her first two scientific papers on enzymes enolase and pyruvate kinase. She has been active on several committees, including review boards for the NIH grants committee and the editorial boards for various scientific journals.


Venue: Meeting Room No. 8, Conference Building