Home / Seminar & Event / / (325-326) Targeted delivery of biologics; Polymers for Drug Delivery: Some Thoughts on the History and Future Opportunities
Home / Seminar & Event / / (325-326) Targeted delivery of biologics; Polymers for Drug Delivery: Some Thoughts on the History and Future Opportunities
(325-326) Targeted delivery of biologics; Polymers for Drug Delivery: Some Thoughts on the History and Future Opportunities
Seminar: (325-326) Targeted delivery of biologics; Polymers for Drug Delivery: Some Thoughts on the History and Future Opportunities
Speaker: Prof. Xiaohu GAO, University of Washington
Time: 2018-10-10 10:00 to 2018-10-10 12:00
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Abstract 1


Nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm size range are of considerable current interest, not only because of their unique size-dependent properties but also their dimensional similarities with biological macromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids and proteins). These similarities could allow an integration of nanotechnology and biology, leading to major advances in medical diagnostics, prognostics, and targeted therapeutics. In this talk, I present recent development of bio-inspired nanoparticles with for targeted delivery of biologic therapeutics.

 

Abstract 2


For the basic sciences of polymer chemistry and physics, an important area of application is drug delivery. The formulation and demonstration of some of the foundational concepts in this field appeared around the middle of the last century. One such concept is the “polymeric drug carrier”, where drug molecules are conjugated, often through covalent bonds, to macromolecules that maintain colloidal stability in aqueous environment. Another is the notion of “controlled drug release from polymers”, where drug particles are trapped physically in solid polymers and then released through solvent-activated diffusion. Over decades these concepts evolved, cross-pollinated, and absorbed new discoveries in biology and medicine, giving rise to a multidisciplinary research landscape with enormous impact. The first part of this talk is a brief reflection on the intellectual origins of some of the prevailing paradigms of today. The second part is to illustrate, with examples, three future opportunities for innovative polymers: [1] delivering “difficult” drugs; [2] “liquid polymers” (or polymer melt); [3] polymers as drugs.  


Prof. GAO Xiaohu.pdf

Prof. WANG Chun.pdf


(325-326) Targeted delivery of biologics; Polymers for Drug Delivery: Some Thoughts on the History and Future Opportunities
Seminar: (325-326) Targeted delivery of biologics; Polymers for Drug Delivery: Some Thoughts on the History and Future Opportunities
Speaker: Prof. Xiaohu GAO, University of Washington
Time: 2018-10-10 10:00 to 2018-10-10 12:00
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Abstract 1


Nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm size range are of considerable current interest, not only because of their unique size-dependent properties but also their dimensional similarities with biological macromolecules (e.g., nucleic acids and proteins). These similarities could allow an integration of nanotechnology and biology, leading to major advances in medical diagnostics, prognostics, and targeted therapeutics. In this talk, I present recent development of bio-inspired nanoparticles with for targeted delivery of biologic therapeutics.

 

Abstract 2


For the basic sciences of polymer chemistry and physics, an important area of application is drug delivery. The formulation and demonstration of some of the foundational concepts in this field appeared around the middle of the last century. One such concept is the “polymeric drug carrier”, where drug molecules are conjugated, often through covalent bonds, to macromolecules that maintain colloidal stability in aqueous environment. Another is the notion of “controlled drug release from polymers”, where drug particles are trapped physically in solid polymers and then released through solvent-activated diffusion. Over decades these concepts evolved, cross-pollinated, and absorbed new discoveries in biology and medicine, giving rise to a multidisciplinary research landscape with enormous impact. The first part of this talk is a brief reflection on the intellectual origins of some of the prevailing paradigms of today. The second part is to illustrate, with examples, three future opportunities for innovative polymers: [1] delivering “difficult” drugs; [2] “liquid polymers” (or polymer melt); [3] polymers as drugs.  


Prof. GAO Xiaohu.pdf

Prof. WANG Chun.pdf