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Home / Seminar & Event /Past Seminars / (310) DNA and RNA as a target of chemistry and a material for chemistry
(310) DNA and RNA as a target of chemistry and a material for chemistry
Seminar: (310) DNA and RNA as a target of chemistry and a material for chemistry
Speaker: Prof. Dennis Gillingham, University of Basel Department of Chemistry
Time: 2018-06-05 14:00 to 2018-06-05 15:00
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Prof. Kenneth Woycechowsky, Health Science Platform


Abstract: DNA is the information carrier of biology. Many drugs target DNA and chemists have invented several ways for editing both DNA and RNA. I will described our projects around DNA and RNA chemistry by answering the following questions: Can we use the information storage capacity of DNA for storing information that has nothing to do with its naturally evolved function?  Do DNA damaging agents used for cancer treatment damage RNA? Do they have any selectivity? Can we apply principles of organometallic chemistry to achieveselective DNA and RNA modification?

Prof. Dennis Gillingham’s CV and the abstract for the talk are attached.

Gillingham_Abstract.docx

Gillingham_Short_CV.docx



(310) DNA and RNA as a target of chemistry and a material for chemistry
Seminar: (310) DNA and RNA as a target of chemistry and a material for chemistry
Speaker: Prof. Dennis Gillingham, University of Basel Department of Chemistry
Time: 2018-06-05 14:00 to 2018-06-05 15:00
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Prof. Kenneth Woycechowsky, Health Science Platform


Abstract: DNA is the information carrier of biology. Many drugs target DNA and chemists have invented several ways for editing both DNA and RNA. I will described our projects around DNA and RNA chemistry by answering the following questions: Can we use the information storage capacity of DNA for storing information that has nothing to do with its naturally evolved function?  Do DNA damaging agents used for cancer treatment damage RNA? Do they have any selectivity? Can we apply principles of organometallic chemistry to achieveselective DNA and RNA modification?

Prof. Dennis Gillingham’s CV and the abstract for the talk are attached.

Gillingham_Abstract.docx

Gillingham_Short_CV.docx