Home / Seminar & Event / / (332) Cellular Communication: Novel Endocannabinoid-like Lipids, Fruit Flies and Other Insects, N-Acyltransferases, and Subtraction Lipidomics
Home / Seminar & Event / / (332) Cellular Communication: Novel Endocannabinoid-like Lipids, Fruit Flies and Other Insects, N-Acyltransferases, and Subtraction Lipidomics
(332) Cellular Communication: Novel Endocannabinoid-like Lipids, Fruit Flies and Other Insects, N-Acyltransferases, and Subtraction Lipidomics
Seminar: (332) Cellular Communication: Novel Endocannabinoid-like Lipids, Fruit Flies and Other Insects, N-Acyltransferases, and Subtraction Lipidomics
Speaker: Dr. David J. Merkler, Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida
Time: 2018-10-29 13:00 to 2018-10-29 14:30
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Health Science Platform


Abstract: 

Fatty acid amides are an extensive family of cell signaling lipids with the general structure of R-CO-NH-Y. This structural simplicity belies a wealth of diversity amongst this lipid family as the R-group is derived from fatty acids (R-COOH) and the Y-group is derived from a number of biogenic amines (H2N-Y). The fatty acid amide family is divided into different classes, which are defined by parent amines. Examples include the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs, R-CO-NH-CH2- CH2OH), the N-acylglycines (NAGs, R-CO-NH-CH2-COOH), and the fatty acid primary amides (PFAMs, R-CO-NH2). In addition to the NAEs, the NAGs, and the PFAMs, other classes of fatty acid amides are known. As the best known fatty acid amide is N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), a fatty acid amide found in the human brain that binds to the cannabinoid receptors.


Merkler_CV_with_Funding_History_Sept_2018.pdf


(332) Cellular Communication: Novel Endocannabinoid-like Lipids, Fruit Flies and Other Insects, N-Acyltransferases, and Subtraction Lipidomics
Seminar: (332) Cellular Communication: Novel Endocannabinoid-like Lipids, Fruit Flies and Other Insects, N-Acyltransferases, and Subtraction Lipidomics
Speaker: Dr. David J. Merkler, Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida
Time: 2018-10-29 13:00 to 2018-10-29 14:30
Venue: Meeting room (406), Building 24
Organizer:

Health Science Platform


Abstract: 

Fatty acid amides are an extensive family of cell signaling lipids with the general structure of R-CO-NH-Y. This structural simplicity belies a wealth of diversity amongst this lipid family as the R-group is derived from fatty acids (R-COOH) and the Y-group is derived from a number of biogenic amines (H2N-Y). The fatty acid amide family is divided into different classes, which are defined by parent amines. Examples include the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs, R-CO-NH-CH2- CH2OH), the N-acylglycines (NAGs, R-CO-NH-CH2-COOH), and the fatty acid primary amides (PFAMs, R-CO-NH2). In addition to the NAEs, the NAGs, and the PFAMs, other classes of fatty acid amides are known. As the best known fatty acid amide is N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), a fatty acid amide found in the human brain that binds to the cannabinoid receptors.


Merkler_CV_with_Funding_History_Sept_2018.pdf